The Catholic University of America

 

 Course number: Course Title (credit hours)

CHEM 103/104: General Chemistry I, II (3,3)
A two-semester modern introductory chemistry course designed to fulfill the chemistry requirements for science students and to lay the foundation for further course work in chemistry. Topics include atomic theory, periodic properties of states of matter, solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base reactions, metathesis reactions, redox reactions, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and chemical properties of selected classes of compounds. Prerequisite or concurrent: 113, 114.
 
CHEM 107: General Chemistry I for Engineers (3)
A one-semester modern introductory chemistry course designed to fulfill the chemistry requirements for engineering students and to lay the foundation for further course work in chemistry. Topics include atomic theory, periodic properties, stoichiometry, nomenclature, bonding, physical properties of states of matter, solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base reactions, metathesis reactions, redox reactions, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and chemical properties of selected classes of compounds. Corequisite:   Chem 113.
 
CHEM 109: General, Organic, and Biochemistry for the Health Sciences (3) 
A one-semester course primarily for nursing students which covers the basics of general, organic and biochemistry. The topics include balancing equations, acid-base, pH, structure and nomenclature of organic compounds including hydrocarbons and compounds containing functional groups, the relationship of the structure of these compounds to the reactions they undergo, carbohydrates, fats, proteins, metabolism and energy.
 
CHEM 110:  Introduction to Earth Science (3)
This course is intended to give a general overview of earth science for students of all schools at all stages of their education.  There are no pre-requisites.  Topics include minerals and rocks, the roles of water, wind and ice in shaping landscapes, forces inside the Earth and their manifestation in the motion of continents, mountain building, earthquakes and volcanoes, the concept of geologic time and Earth's history, the global ocean, the atmosphere, and global climate change.
 
CHEM 113/CHEM114: General Chemistry Laboratory I, II (2,2)
A two-semester sequence of  laboratory courses designed to accompany CHEM103/CHEM104 or CHEM107. Experiments give the student exposure to basic laboratory techniques and illustrate the principles of chemistry from experimental data. Co-requisite: CHEM 103 or CHEM 107.
 
CHEM 119: General, Organic, and Biochemical Chemistry for Health Sciences Laboratory (2)
A laboratory course to accompany Chem 109. Experiments will provide students with experience in basic laboratory techniques for acid-base, pH, organic modeling and reactions and biochemistry techniques.
 
CHEM 125: Chemistry in Our Lives (3)
This course is designed for non-science majors who are interested in understanding the chemistry behind personal products and problems in the real world. Topics include air pollution, global warming, ozone depletion, and energy.
 
CHEM 126: Chemistry in Modern Times (3)
This course is designed for non-science majors who are interested in understanding the chemistry behind personal products and problems in the real world. Topics include the chemistry of polymers including plastics, over the counter and prescription drugs, food and food additives and genetic engineering. 
 
CHEM 203/204: Organic Chemistry I, II (3,3)
A two-semester course designed to introduce science majors to the study of organic compounds, their structure, bonding, stereochemistry, and reactivity. Prerequisites: 104, 114; prerequisite or concurrent: 213, 214
 
CHEM 213,214: Organic Chemistry Laboratory I, II (2,2)
Laboratory to accompany 203, 204. Prerequisite or concurrent: 203, 204.
 
CHEM 308/ENG 408: Batteries, Fuel Cells, and Energy Storage (3)
A lecture course covering the basic theory and methods of energy storage, with emphasis on electrochemical storage technology. Topics include electrochemistry, chemical principles of operation and design of batteries and fuel cells, individual battery types (lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride, lithium ion), hydrogen and non-hydrogen fuel cells, operational issues of batteries and fuel cells, and selected non-chemical methods of energy storage.  For more information, click here.
 
CHEM 311: Analytical Chemistry (5)
A lecture and laboratory course applying the principles of chemical equilibrium to quantitative analysis, with emphasis on environmental chemistry. Prequisites: 104,114
 
CHEM 317: Principles of Environmental Science (3)
This course introduces fundamental concepts needed to understand the biological and chemical impact of humankind on earth: how ecosystems work and adapt to change; sustainability; population growth; water, air, and soil pollution; water, nutrient, and waste management; resource depletion; energy issues and the future of solar and other renewable energy sources.
 
CHEM 318: Seminar in Enviromental Science (1)
Selected topics of current environmental interest. Examines the conflicting views on population growth, water pollution, air pollution, chemical pesticides, ozone depletion, and global warming in the light of currently available information.
 
CHEM 351/351: Physical Chemistry I, II (3,3)
A two-semester sequence designed to introduce students to the theoretical principles of chemistry. Prerequisites: 104, 114; PHYS 215, 216, or equivalent; MATH 112 or equivalent.
 
CHEM 353: Physical Chemistry I Lab (2)
Laboratory course; to be taken concurrently with 351. Corequisite: 351.
 
CHEM 395: Materials Science & Engineering (2)
This course explores the characteristics of metals, ceramics, plastics, and composites; atomic and crystalline structures of materials; material defects; phase equilibria; diffusion; microstructures; mechanical properties of materials; processing-property relationships for steel; environmental effects on materials. Prerequisites: Chem 103 or Chem 107 and Chem 113.
 
CHEM 401: Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3)
 This course covers topics in the field of inorganic chemistry, selected from the general areas of transition metal, main group and organometallic chemistry, and theories of structure and bonding. Prerequisite: 204, 351, 352, or permission of instructor.
 
CHEM 402: Bioinorganic Chemistry (3)
A one-semester lecture course with primary focus on the role that transition metals play in biological processes. Discussion of structures of active sites of metalloenzymes and the mechanisms of the reactions they promote, in terms of existing experimental data on the native systems and model compounds. Systems included are oxygen binding and transport, heme and non-heme electron transfer, copper blue proteins, nitrogen fixation, and inorganic pharmaceuticals. Prerequisites: 501 or 571 or permission of instructor.
 
CHEM 405: Science Communication (3)
This course explore forms of science communication for expert and non-scientist audiences. Topics include writing technical papers, publication, ethics of scientific communication, and peer review. The course will include practical exercises for written and oral communications.
 
CHEM 408: Instrumental Analysis & Chemical Spectroscopy (3)
A lecture course in the use of instruments for chemical analysis, including spectrophotometry, chromatography, and electrochemical methods, and a comprehensive overview of spectroscopy and its analytical applications. Prerequisites: 204, 214, 311.
 
CHEM 418: Chemical Instrumentation Lab (3)
A laboratory course to accompany Chem 408 - Instrumental Analysis. Prerequisite: 311; co-requisite: 408. 
 
CHEM 471/472: Biochemistry I, II (3,3)
A two-semester sequence that explores the chemistry of biological systems, including discussion of important metabolic pathways. Prerequisites: 204, 214.
 
CHEM 493: Undergraduate Research (3)
Guided participation in the research project of a consenting faculty member chosen by the student. Prerequisite: Permission of department chair.

CHEM 495: Chemistry Internship (3)
This for-credit internship requires 140-150 hours at an internship location and additional meetings with the internship coordinator in the department.
 
CHEM 496: Biochemical Techniques (3)
An accelerated laboratory course devoted to modern experimental procedures in biochemistry. Prerequisite: Chem 471 or equivalent. Co-requisite: Chem 472-Biochemistry II.
 
CHEM 498: Undergraduate Comprehensive Examination (0)